Port Townsend/Lake Crescent Adventure

Hi everyone,

After my recent shenanigans, I’m so inspired by the idea of mini travel blogs. In other words, writing more adventure pieces about places I find and love. Growing up in the Seattle area does not mean you know every corner like the back of your hand. Quite the contrary, I am loving experiencing Seattle in different ways, from different perspectives.

Recently, I drove up the peninsula, starting with the Kingston Ferry, with the lovely company of my friend Joshua. First of all, starting off mornings with a quality americano and a foggy ferry ride is bliss. When you’re not in a rush. For those that have constant appointments and to-do-lists as I do, pressing the re-set button is essential. If you spend the weekdays in the city, get out into nature on the weekend. It clears your mind, trust me.

Here’s me trying not to pull a Marylyn. Who knew ferries could make such great last minute photoshoots?

Marylyn Ferry

Ferry Cam

The Kingston ferry gives you a nice car ride through Port Gamble, which was an accidental but much needed stop along the way to Lake Crescent.

All of the details of the porches and the quaint vintage shops were so precious. Here is a woman that spent 20 minutes telling me how she goes about her weaving on a daily basis. I asked to take her portrait:

IMG_7576

IMG_7578

 

 

 

So let’s talk about Lake Crescent. I think this lake is underrated. I know Oregon is supposed to have amazing lakes (like Crater Lake), but this one is in our backyard in Seattle! If you don’t want to camp or stay in the lodge, a day trip is totally doable. Especially if you don’t get as distracted as we did along the way.

I think I spent over an hour of some of the most relaxing time ever this day at the lake. The sun was out, making the lake glitter with summer vibes. Everyone was sitting on the porch of the lodge in rocking chairs or in the yard. I really didn’t want to leave my rocking chair. There’s something to be said about quality quiet time after a week of noise.

IMG_7739img_7718.jpgIMG_7712

The next stop was Port Townsend. We got there right at sunset to snap a few shots in some flower fields. But after a long day of adventuring, nothing sounded better than dinner. We came across Sirens Pub, of which I highly recommend. They made a mushroom quesadilla that I wouldn’t dream of making at home. Mostly because I don’t have that much confidence in the kitchen! This is something I’ve been wanting to work on for years, but that’s a whole different topic.

Unfortunately we did not have time to get to the old fashioned candy store that I always load up on when I visit Port Townsend, but all in all I’m really impressed with how much we explored in a full day’s time! Mini adventures are good for the soul, take my word on that. I encourage anyone to take even day trips in the Pacific Northwest.

I hope you all enjoyed this different post and the pictures we snapped along the way! Stay tuned for some more adventure posts for Summer, as well as my new photography section now up on the blog! xx

-K

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What It’s Like to be an Outgoing Introvert

 

fix-coffee

What’s on my mind:

The distinction between extroverts and introverts. There is something to be said for categorizing someone into one of these categories, when mixtures definitely exist. I would know because I am one.

I’m what is known as an outgoing introvert. I like to be around people and have that social component in my life, but I prefer to recharge by myself. I have put together some indicators that you might be similar, and these could help you learn about yourself. Knowing your own personality helps when interacting with contrasting personality types.

Observations:

You have a high level of self-awareness, and you are not shy, just simply naturally introverted. Shyness and introversion differ because shyness is considered a behavior, versus introversion is more of a choice as well as a preference. In other words, you choose when you wish to interact and when you’d rather observe. This really doesn’t have a correlation with being shy.

You find yourself actually penciling in (or making a mental note) to set aside time for yourself. You mental well-being requires this alone time, in order to have the energy and desire to then go forward with social interaction.

Do you love to go to coffee shops alone to work? Me too. I love to be surrounded by people in a coffee shop but left alone to do my work or write my posts. I like having the energy around me and complete control to either engage or not. (insert the “but first, coffee” ongoing trending phrase)

You can confuse others about this mixture of social identities. Sometimes people just assume you’re very extroverted given your approachable nature when you choose to be. When you switch back and forth from your more introverted self, people can be confused by the variation.

You are a fan of inner monologue. Or maybe you are not a fan, but you do this constantly anyway. Outgoing introverts tend to re-play conversations and even lay out future ones, which can lead to over-thinking. Being very thoughtful in this sense is important, but sometimes can be perceived as overdoing it.

You do (maybe not often) experience loneliness. This one I’ll chip in on. I personally like to be independent a good majority of the time. I played a college sport that was 90% mental, and is known as an individual sport. I like to blog, write, and even sketch, all activities being solo activities. I often find it hard relating to people in terms of how we prefer to spend our time, so this narrows down that interaction even more. Then again, I’m working two jobs that I constantly interact and have fun with my coworkers. I make sure to have this balance.

Now onto relationships. Again, personally, people I have been interested in the past all say something very similar: they have a hard time reading me. I apologize for not being predictable, it’s just not in my nature (although I never apologized for being hard to read). If a person takes more time to discover the layers, is this really a bad thing? I think not. There’s a reason why people love the mystery behind movie plotlines. 

As for social engagements, outgoing introverts can be very personable and talkative in these settings, but also be completely drained afterwards. This speaks to me, for I really need to be alone after a lot of social energy, just to have the silence for a while. Word of advice: don’t break this silence, it’s crucial.

I don’t know about the rest of you, but I believe extraversion and “teamwork” are somewhat overplayed in the workplace. We are taught in school to put up with group projects to prepare ourselves for our careers, which makes sense, but there is a reason why we dread them. I completely agree that collaboration is essential for a functioning organization or company, but some personalities gain their creativity and innovative ideas when working independently.

I wish I knew this about myself in high school, but outgoing introverts tend to somewhat dislike rights of passages. A really good example would be the senior prom. I remember there was so much buildup it actually made the event less fun, and it was this huge right of passage that everyone needed to take part in. I’m not saying my prom experience wasn’t good, but it was the principle of it being the “right” way to go out with a bang.

Outgoing introverts pick and choose pretty specifically. I’m specific about friends as well as social events. If I don’t want to hang out with someone I won’t. If all of my friends tell me an event is a must, I won’t attend if I know I’d be dissatisfied. I know myself in that sense. The negative reaction I often get from this is people taking it personally, that I’m withdrawing too much and put myself on a higher wavelength. This is definitely not the case, and the sad thing is if someone were to ask me instead of assume, there would be no hard feelings.

Us individuals also tend to thrive on improvement and progression. Getting “stuck” is not appealing, and the perfectionist behavior comes out in order to move forward. Seeking inner growth is also common, along with the occasional overanalyzing.

Lastly, the work and social life of an outgoing introvert may portray different personalities. By this I mean that these individuals, including myself, are outgoing and good at networking in the work life, and even enjoy being in control and communicating, but the social life may be a lot quieter. For me, I don’t like doing things in big groups. I like to hang out with one or two people, maybe three. If it’s a large group I feel less and less inclined to talk. Again, if someone you know tends to skip larger group hangouts, they might just not prefer them.

I hope this cleared up some explanations for those who have tried to understand the outgoing introverts, and for those that fall in this category. In truth, there’s nothing wrong with categorizing someone in order to better understand and interact with them.

Do these traits seem to match you? Let me know what you all think about my take on this, or your opinion of personality types. Do you find it useful to know someone’s personality type in the everyday? Feel free to comment below.

Thanks for reading! xx

-Kelly

College Expectations Unsaid

You heard in high school that college would be the best four years of your life. Let’s the discuss the major flaws in this statement.

What’s on my mind: What you don’t expect from college. The uncensored, unedited version of that educational environment you spent a previous four years staring at a GPA and preparing standardized test scores for.

We go through life often looking forward to a future result. We plan ahead, we set goals, and one of these goals is often where we attend college, and what we will study when we get there. But what happens when you actually get there? For me, I completely resent the idea of saying college was the best four years of my life. I’d like to consider it a trek for the better, a battle won for myself.

Life after college is not a set path, there is no universal option. There are opinions, expectations, social norms. You might want a pet chamelion as opposed to a dog, you might not want kids, or a van, or a big kitchen. You might not want a permanent postal address. And this is okay. Whatever it is, you build on it after you leave the college security blanket.

Rather than write out the reasons why I personally reject this statement, here’s a different format:

You’re doubtful in

your steps on the way to class,

Or your choice to stay in.

You second guess

Your surroundings,

Your purpose,

Your point of view.

You slip from optimism to the open-ended,

As you stare at numerical figures

To represent your worth,

Your capabilities.

You think of the real world,

And how you’re not a part of it,

As you muster up hypothetical elevator talks,

And convince yourself you’ll turn a corner

In a week,

In a day,

And everything will make sense,

Exactly as you planned in your

Decorated journals

And proudest essays.

Yet you are finished,

You hit a milestone that

Was meant to be an overpowering

Revelation,

That has only brought you uncertainty.

Four years flew by,

Without your conceding.

You chase something else,

Something to fill the gaps,

That widen as you struggle down

the honorary carpet.

The truth: The best years are relative,

Limiting you from pushing the bar,

From being amazed at small details,

Engrossed in still moments,

Appreciate what you have yet to do.

You have so much to do,

Darling,

Don’t sell yourself short.

xx – Kelly

The Increasing Value of Creative Individuals in Our Society

IMG_5993.JPG

Hi everyone,

I’ve gone a bit off the grid from blogging the past two weeks, so my apologies in advance for the absent content. I have in this time taken on two jobs, one internship and one paid part-time. After landing these positions, I wanted to discuss the need of things in life that cannot be bought, or achieved by climbing a ladder of accomplishment or praise.

I am currently in the post-graduate phase of major contemplation. I want to start making strides to my future career, and build a life for myself. A life that makes me happy, and one of substance. On the other hand, I think this period of my life is crucial in other ways. Self-reflection and development need to be put at a high value, in addition to resume qualifications.

Breaking the mold of the typical race to post-graduate employment is something I have been considering myself. I’m not ready for a 9 to 5 office job, nor do I think I ever will be. I am just now having the chance to act on all of my interests, my side hobbies pushed aside due to previous obligations.

I can’t even narrow down a label for myself in my Instagram bio. I want to explore and create through my twenties, and always be reminded of why I get to be myself every day. I am passionate about health, but I want to write wherever and whenever possible, and embrace my creative outlets. I’m not concerned with making money, because the saying “money doesn’t buy happiness” is not just motivational, it’s also a warning not to falsely prioritize your life.

There is hope for other artists and creatives out there, in fact, I just read an article published by the Guardian about the need of investments of artists and creatives in our society. The article talks about how the arts and culture especially create a basis for overall societal function.

Which word sounds more appealing, price or value?

The artists of our society compliment other sectors. Without creative people, there would be less beauty and pleasure on a wide scale. One can even say a society would not survive without these individuals. Without creativity, amazing award-winning films, opera and orchestra performances, art galleries and many other features would not exist. What kind of world would that be?

Stanford’s Social Intervention Review also dips into this topic with high appraisal of the arts and creative expression, pointing out that they have made our society shift from manufactured to innovative. Culture and art dictate social change, and social change determines the progressive ability of a society.

To think of it another way, everyone is said to have their role, one that they contribute to better the overall community as a whole. Economies are set up with everyone doing their part in order for it to function. Roles, however, are not just positions within a law firm, engineers in the newest apartment complexes, or scientists within large laboratories. The creatives and artists also play a role. Sometimes it’s hard to grasp that these people, who primarily aim to bring inspiration to others, are often concerned about the paycheck while others are at ease financially.

No, this is not a review of the above articles. I’m simply relieved that creative expression is being nationally recognized as a necessity to a well-balanced system. These Sunday reads inspire me to move farther into my years of creativity, and not wait to see how it all lays out financially.

Arts and culture within society ignite an incandescence to our emotional lives. Humans are meant to be emotional beings, as opposed to being desensitized by daily routines and responsibilities.

What makes you feel like your most creative self? Ask yourself, where does the creativity come from? It won’t come from textbooks or a steady income. It comes from within.

Being 22 years old in such a progressive society,  I notice how expectations have changed, even in my lifetime. Master’s degrees are starting to become as vital to employment as bachelor’s degrees were years ago. You’re expected to have work experience when you don’t know where to start. At what point is this constant building of yourself on paper going to resemble a life well lived? It might for some depending on the content. For others, they may feel constantly awkward, not properly conforming.

For example: I want to see more of the United States. I’ve been to a handful of states, and I always crave new adventures. Since I know finances play a role, I’m saving up for these adventures. Once I have enough, I plan to be very mobile at various times, always learning from everyday interaction with people from all over, people that see the world a little more similarly to me in terms of what defines a life well spent.

This can all be a battle between one’s mind and heart. What really resonates with you and what will enrich you most may not make complete logical sense.

I have recently spent time with amazingly talented freelance photographers that are living their creative passions, and I feel as though I have found my people (corny perhaps to say). It’s nothing short of refreshing to be around individuals that wake up and seek out fulfilling moments. Quality company of those that strive for similar things in life really has sent me encouraging vibes that i’m not alone in my deepest desires.

What’s saddening is that people have visions of what they want their life to look like, the experiences they want to have, yet they feel that they are out of reach. In all honesty, they don’t have to be unrealistic.

Will you be a part of the increasing creative initiative?

Thanks for reading, have a lovely week. xx

-Kelly