Reasoning to Ditch the Weight Scale

Hi everyone,

I’ve been very into posting about mental health topics and self-esteem lately due to the volume of literature I’ve been consumed in! I do believe that a healthy state of mind brings better  productivity and overall happiness.

Self-esteem is often connected to weight. Weight is often measured through the scale. Today I am going to share why I never look at the scale to determine my progress to meet my body goals.

Every year we go to the doctor’s office for a check-up (or maybe more often), and they often weigh patients. This makes sense completely, and this is the only time I step on the scale throughout the entire year. Why? Because it’s known to be an obsessive tool to measure your contentment with your body.

When I used to step on the scale in the gym or following my sister and mother I would always be surprised with my weight. I always fluctuated, and I often weighed more than I thought I would. I am an athlete, and muscle weighs heavier, but in a world of scrutinizing behavior and tragic self-loathing in terms of weight loss, even I had brief negative thoughts.

Muscle composition is healthy, and height also plays a major role in weight. I stand tall at about 5 foot eleven inches. Coupled with muscle from weight training, I have technically gained weight. Despite the number that reads off the piece of metal, I love my body more than ever. If that sounds off, you need to step off the scale and stop using it to determine your body image happiness.

I go off the mirror and how I look and feel to determine my happiness with my fitness results. After four years of being monitored with weight training and occasional nutrition plans I never felt completely satisfied throughout my college career. Now that I have complete control, I just use visuals.

Using the number on a scale is basically comparing yourself to others. I’m an athletic girl who is fit skinny, not fashion skinny or rail thin. I do freelance modeling in clothes that I feel comfortable in. I follow my own style and I practice a well-balanced fitness routine to cater to my whole body and mind.

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The scale is a negative thought that rests in your mind. You may never reach the goal you want from a number because your body proportions don’t match. You will soon focus on the number and possibly alter your lifestyle and diet, and become more and more unhappy. If you do reach the number, you may continue lowering it as your negative obsession spirals out of control.

Don’t let a machine run your life. A scale is an object. There are countless times I have been in a  locker room where there is a line to step on the scale, and I can practically feel the sense of hope and anxiety of people in that line as they await their number.

When is the last time you felt great about your body? Was it on a run outside, or a particular outfit you put on and loved? These small details and activities matter, and matter more than a number.

If you want the facts about scales:

  • They will be slightly different in reads, making the number inconsistent
  • They are very sensitive to clothes, accessories, shoes, etc
  • It matters what type of surface they stand on
  • They don’t give you any distinction of fat versus muscle composition

Does the above sound appealing?

Labeling yourself to a narrow vision of beauty by using a scale is just selling yourself short. You will not be the same as the person behind you with different proportions and varying genetic gifts from mom and dad.

I see body image and weight management this way: I workout and find ways to enhance my natural features as opposed to losing overall weight. Work with what you have and you might be pleasantly surprised with the result. Focus on what is positive and what you do like about your body, not what you wish you would change if you could.

Focus on how you feel and what your body visually looks like instead of trying to achieve a label or number. Using the scale to achieve the “perfect body” is so opinion based. What is even the perfect body? This is simply a comparison you would be happier without.

Consistent obsessions with weight scales has caused:

  • Development of eating disorders
  • Depression
  • Poor body image issues
  • Obsession of diet and calorie counting
  • Blindness to real results due to the number

There are ways to boost your self-image while going through your progress to the body you want. Wear a wardrobe that you feel confident in, eat to fuel your body and do not limit your food intake to reach an unhealthy goal. Eat regularly, and if you need to make changes in your current diet start with one or two foods to gradually eliminate and go from there. It’s all progression, not an immediate result.

Weight does not determine beauty.

The scale does not aid you in a healthy lifestyle. It should not run your life, nor should it bring you your primary validation to achieve your personal goals. If it helps more, have tunnel vision at the gym and focus on you, don’t focus on others around you that are at different stages and obtain varying physique.

I hope this message found you all well, and you will put yourself first before a self-deprecating path of weight measurement. Embrace what you have to offer, and love your body. Thanks for reading! ❤

-Kelly

 

 

Health Impacts of Undeserved Authority

Hi everyone,

Like it or not, it’s my comedy post for the week (I hope you actually like it). I’m gonna turn a somewhat unfortunate ongoing situation into an inside joke now made public.

Have you ever felt unimpressed with authority? I’m not talking about local law enforcement, I’m talking about those individuals in your everyday life that have some sort of ability to have authority over you, and you don’t really like it.

Whether you feel used, disrespected, or unappreciated, this is a welcome sign to how to cope and make the situation comical. People that have a management position that really shouldn’t often have their own insecurities and they tend to reveal them in their work. I had to deal with these people every day in my college career in athletics.

Corrupt management in any way can harm the mental health of a worker in an organization or a player in a program. It’s a hard situation  where it seems like there is no winning (ironic if you’re a college competitor).

I am absolutely not saying college athletics is something I regret; quite the opposite. But even though I was playing the sport I love, I still had to put up with the people that secured my feelings of being unimpressed by authority. I’m keeping this super anonymous, because it’s always good to have a little bit of imagination…

I worked so hard for four years, at two different universities for tennis. I loved the game, and this very poor authority kept creeping into my daily thoughts unless I found this comedic edge. I would say I successfully found it during junior year, where I would actually laugh to myself and it made me feel so much better.

Just because someone is above you on the job ladder or social agenda, or any system you’re a part of, does NOT mean they necessarily have earned that place. They also have not earned the right to practice poor management. They have not earned the right to interfere with your daily tasks, goals, or emotional mindset.

So much of everything is about politics, and everyone can’t stand politicians, right? Right.

Laugh at them. Maybe not outwardly laugh, because you might not want to deal with confrontation, but make these people small in your head. They are a stepping stone to your life, and when you’re gone, they will still be there trying to sweep away their failed attempts at ‘management’ and ‘leadership.’

People are not pawns, they are not pieces to maneuver or micromanage, and it’s wrong. So keep thinking it is, because you’re right. Don’t shrink into the habit of not having a voice. You might not speak up and never know you’re a bada**, or even a really good public speaker. Or both.

Not all authority have the right to obtain that authority. Plain and simple. Managers, leaders, coaches, etc. If you aren’t a leader, why is it on your name tag or LinkedIn profile? Because you shouldn’t be, and those you lead lose respect for you. That’s how it works.

You can still listen and cooperate without respect. 

I completely lost respect for these individuals in those four years, and I’m very fortunate to have tougher skin to be able to stand up for myself. You should too. Because people that push boundaries in authority do so because:

A) They shouldn’t be a leader

B) They don’t know what they’re doing

C) They can’t see anyone saying anything about it

I’m not saying to walk around the place like you’re the #1, but hold yourself up without using others as crutches to hold your ground. Be humble but strong in your opinions and values, and use your voice if something isn’t right.

I was on a scholarship, paid to do a job, which was my athletic commitment to the university. I loved being a contributor and an athlete. I didn’t love the politics associated with it. I didn’t love when people of authority didn’t act morally or correctly when they had a place of power, so I stood against that power. And to this day I am proud of myself for that, and my family consistently tells me that they’re proud of me too.

Anticipate to be alone while standing your ground. Don’t expect people to back you up, but when they do, those are the people to keep. It takes one person to reject an amateur leader. If the system doesn’t change there’s nothing else you can do about that, but you can reject it when you are experiencing it.

I understand that situations differ in what you can and cannot say, and not everyone is a part of the no filter club (it’s a good club though if you’re interested). I’m simply saying that if you are investing time and money into something where you are working so hard, you deserve to question bad authority.

This world is full of judgers and perceivers. Both types can be great people, but filling into the judging position makes you embrace healthy resistance to an unjust power.

Standing out when everyone else is following the same patterns is not a negative thing. Be like this duck:

Fit In

The duck stands out, right? Your eyes go directly to it.

Consider your health and wellbeing of the highest value. You are your own person and be proud of your strength. Thanks for reading! xx

-Kelly ❤